Melania Trump SAVAGELY Attacked After White House First Photo Shooting

First Lady Melania Trump shined during the photoshoot at the White House, as the pictures were for a very special occasion. But it seems that there are still a few people who are not amazed by the beauty of our First Lady. Right after Melania finished the photo session, she and her fashion designer were viciously attacked out of nowhere.

Since Donald Trump got elected, and she took the stage as a First Lady, Melania has faced many battles with the liberals. So many angry citizens refuse to accept her, as a First Lady, and her designers. They think that it was a bigger honor to dress Michelle Obama instead of the beautiful Melania. Many fashion designers publicly slandered Melania, saying that she would be an embarrassment to their designs.

In her most recent photoshoot for the official White House photography, Melania wore Dolce & Gabbana black suit and scarf. She looked PERFECT! Everyone was talking about her outfit. The designer was privileged to be part of Melania’s photo that will go down in history, but the liberals think differently.

Right after the photoshoot, both Melania and her fashion designer were attacked by hateful liberals who can’t appreciate pure class. They started with Melania and how she overused airbrush, and she supposedly was not nearly as classy as Michelle was. Her designer was attacked because he proudly accepted to be a part of Melania’s outfit.

Stefano Gabbana responded to the critics, rather than acting a coward boycotting the first pair, and he instantly became among the most beloved designers among the conservatives. His response will leave you speechless.

The proud designer of Melania, told his critics to “go to hell.”

“In a post to his Instagram account, the 54-year-old Italian designer proudly displayed the First Lady’s official portrait — released by the White House on Monday — which featured Trump wearing a D&G blazer.” His brutal response to his critics made him a target of attacks, for which he responded with a knockout punch to all those with their mouth – wide open.

“So you have lost a follower, and worst, an admirer,” Instagram user, @_boyafraid_ commented on the designer’s post. “[I] don’t care!! Really,” Gabbana replied, followed with “vai a cagare,” or “go to hell” in Italian.

Gabbana joins the designers who proudly accepted to dress the classiest First Lady. He among with Tommy Hilfiger and Diane von Furstenburg will be working on an incredible woman, and enjoy the pride.

President Donald Trump earned $153 million and paid $36.5 million in income taxes in 2005

President Donald Trump earned $153 million and paid $36.5 million in income taxes in 2005, paying a roughly 25 percent effective tax rate thanks to a tax he has since sought to eliminate, according to highly sought-after newly-disclosed tax documents.

The pages from Trump’s federal tax return show the then-real estate mogul also reported a business loss of $103 million that year, although the documents don’t provide detail. The forms show that Trump paid an effective tax rate of 24.5 percent, a figure well above the roughly 10 percent the average American taxpayer forks over each year, but below the 27.4 percent that taxpayers earning 1 million dollars a year average were paying at the time, according to data from the Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation.

The tax forms were obtained by journalist David Cay Johnston, who runs a website called DCReport.org, and reported on MSNBC’s “The Rachel Maddow Show.” Johnston, who has long reported on tax issues, said he received the documents in the mail, unsolicited.

Trump’s hefty business loss appears to be a continued benefit from his use of a tax loophole in the 1990s, which allowed him to deduct previous losses in future years. In 1995, Trump reported a loss of more than $900 million, largely as a result of financial turmoil at his casinos.

Tax records obtained by The New York Times last year showed the losses were so large they could have allowed Trump to avoid paying taxes for up to 18 years. But Trump’s 2005 filing shows that another tax prevented him from realizing the full benefit of those deductions.

The bulk of Trump’s tax bill that year was due to the Alternative Minimum Tax, a tax aimed at preventing high-income earners from paying minimal taxes.

The AMT requires many taxpayers to calculate their taxes twice — once under the rules for regular income tax and then again under AMT — and then pay the higher amount. Critics say the tax has ensnared more middle-class people than intended, raising what they owe the federal government each year.

Were it not for the AMT, Trump would have avoided all but a few million dollars of his 2005 tax bill.

Trump’s campaign website called for the end
of the AMT, which is expected to bring in more than $350 billion in revenues from 2016 to 2025.

As a candidate and as president, Trump has refused to release his tax returns, breaking a decades-long tradition. Although he initially promised to do so, he later claimed he was under audit by the Internal Revenue Service and said his attorneys had advised against it — though experts and IRS officials said such audits don’t bar taxpayers from releasing their returns.

The White House pushed back even before the release of the documents Tuesday night, saying that publishing the information was illegal.

“You know you are desperate for ratings when you are willing to violate the law to push a story about two pages of tax returns from over a decade ago,” the White House said in a statement issued on condition that it be attributed to an anonymous official, although the president has decried the use of anonymous sources.

The unauthorized release or publishing of federal tax returns is a criminal offense, punishable by a fine of up to $5,000 and up to five years in jail. But Maddow argued that MSNBC was exercising its First Amendment right to publish information in the public interest.

Trump long insisted the American public wasn’t interested in his returns and said little could be learned from them. But Trump’s full returns would contain key details about things like his charitable giving, his income sources, the type of deductions he claimed, how much he earned from his assets and what strategies Trump used to reduce his tax bill.

The issue was a major point of attack from his election rival Hillary Clinton, who suggested Trump had something to hide.

The White House has not said whether or not the president plans to release his returns while he’s in office. More than 1 million people have signed a White House petition urging the president to release them.

Veterans meet with Trump at the White House

Ten major veterans groups sat down with President Donald Trump on Friday to discuss veterans issues ranging from health care for women to creating a White House office dedicated to veteran empowerment.

Veterans groups have worked for months to secure the meeting with Trump, who had made veterans issues a major part of presidential campaign. Several of the veterans who attended the listening session with Trump described the meeting as “positive” and “conversational.”

“He was really into the conversation, and his staff promised more conversations. They seemed dedicated to that,” said Joe Chenelly, director of American Veterans. “We’ll take the president at his word when he says this is just the beginning of working together as partners and reforming the [Department of Veterans Affairs], particularly the health care issues.”

In addition to Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, VA Secretary David Shulkin and senior White House staff, including Kellyanne Conway, Stephen Miller, Sean Spicer, Jared Kushner and Omarosa Manigault were present, the veterans said.

Organizations represented were the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Student Veterans of America, Vietnam Veterans of America, American Veterans, Concerned Veterans forAmerica, Paralyzed Veterans of America, Disabled American Veterans, Military Order of the Purple Heart and Got Your 6.

Paul Rieckhoff, director of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, took to Twitter on Friday, saying he was disappointed the White House denied IAVA’s request to attend.

Verna Jones, executive director of the American Legion, had strongly appealed for the meeting. Bill Rausch, executive director of the veterans nonprofit Got Your 6, said he thought the meeting showed the White House’s commitment to the veteran community.

“We’re hoping this is one of many,” Jones said of the meeting with the president.

During the meeting, Trump refuted claims he would privatize the VA, Jones said, reiterating a message Shulkin and key Republican lawmakers have conveyed in recent months.

“He assured us the VA is here to stay, that they’re not going to privatize it – veterans will have a healthy VA,” Jones said.

Some groups have expressed concerns that veterans’ health care would move too far into the private sector and remove services from the VA, which they see as providing care uniquely fit for veterans.

Rausch said there was “a clear consensus for support of the veteran community through a strong VA” during the meeting.

The members from each group took turns talking to Trump about their priorities. Some of them spoke about the Veterans Choice Program, which veterans use to receive care in the private sector when they can’t get an appointment at a VA facility. The program, which has been criticized as complex and confusing, is in flux. It will expire in August without action from Congress, and Shulkin is working on an improved version that he promises will have “less red tape.”

Chenelly told Trump that the choice program should continue, but the VA should better inform veterans about their options when deciding where to seek health care.

Rausch proposed Trump sign an executive order establishing a new office in the White House dedicated to veteran empowerment. Trump was receptive to the idea, Rausch said, and asked Pence to follow up.

Others told Trump about the need to modernize the process that veterans use to claim disability and pension compensation and the need for more benefits to caregivers of veterans injured pre-9/11, Jones and Chenelly said. They also asked for more details about an announcement that Shulkin made last week that he would expand urgent mental health care for veterans with other-than-honorable discharges.

“There was not a lot of response from them, but I saw that as our chance to have our voices heard,” Chenelly said.

In statements before the meeting, Shulkin thanked Trump for the budget that he proposed Thursday for the VA, which includes a $4.4 billion increase from 2017.

“I think you’re upholding your commitment to showing that this country cares about the veterans, and you’ve given us the ability to make sure that we are able to care for them,” Shulkin told Trump.

Shulkin also thanked the Republican-led House for passing legislation Thursday that would allow him to quickly fire, demote and suspend VA employees. That bill now will now go to the Senate, but there’s no clear timeline of when senators will consider it.

Mark Lucas, executive director of Concerned Veterans for America, said he urged Trump during the meeting to talk to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., about expediting a vote on the bill.

Trump said he’s heard “horrible stories” about the VA but “already a lot of improvements are being made.”

He said he was forming a VA board that will be comprised of businessmen and medical professionals. Isaac “Ike” Perlmutter, CEO of Marvel Entertainment, is part of that board, Trump said, though he did not say who else will take part. The president also announced a “major” meeting about the VA scheduled for Friday night at his Mar-a-Lago estate.

Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., has been critical of Trump for not meeting with veterans groups. He said Friday that the listening session was a “step in the right direction.”

“Moving forward, I am hopeful the administration will better engage with key veterans’ advocates to ensure they have a seat at the table in shaping policies,” he said in a statement.

Trump and Merkel didn’t shake hands in Oval Office!

WASHINGTON, D.C.

A photo-op of the Oval Office meeting between the German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Donald Trump ended on a slightly awkward note. Photographers, who were briefly ushered into the room, snapped photos of the two leaders, who were seated.

The photographers could then be heard calling out, “Handshake” in order to get the obligatory photo of the two shaking hands. Mr. Trump didn’t respond, but Merkel could be heard saying something to him about a handshake, though most of what she said couldn’t be heard. Mr. Trump, who was not looking at her at the moment, may also not have heard her, but the moment appeared to be a little uncomfortable.